Legumes for hard hill country

Posted by on Mar 14, 2019 in Featured Slider | 0 comments

Legumes for hard hill country

Over 60% of New Zealand hill country is in low fertility and wetter regions. Legumes still provide a significant opportunity in these environments, but systems to establish and manage those legumes to capture their benefits are lacking. A national series of workshops with farmers in 2016/17 identified a clear need to provide information and farm systems based around legumes which can perform in low fertility and high rainfall regions.

 

References

White clover morphology and grazing management

Seasonal grazing management effects on branching strucutre and dry weight of white clover plants in mixed swards – (1988) Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Association 49: 197-201

Evaluation of New Zealand bred White Clover cultivars under rotational grazing and set stocking with sheep – (1988) Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Association 49: 203-206

Fifty years of White Clover research in New Zealand – J Brock, J Caradus & MJM Hay (1989) Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Association 50: 25-39

A review of the role of grazing management on the growth and performance of white clover cultivars in lowland New Zealand pastures – J Brock & MJM Hay (1995) New Zealand Grassland Association: Research and Practice Series No. 6

Influence of grazing management and drought on white clover population performance and genotypic frequency – (1996) New Zealand Grassland Association: Research and Practice Series No. 6

White clover performance in sown pastures: A biological/ecological perspective – (2001) Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Association 63: 73-83

Deferred grazing to enhance white clover content in pastures – RN Watson et al (1996) New Zealand Grassland Association: Research and Practice Series No. 6

Red Clover

A review of 10 year’s research with red clovers under grazing in Southland RJM Hay and DL Ryan (1989) Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Association 50

 

Lotus

A descriptive note on the growth habit of Lotus Pedunculatus Cav.  GW Sheath (1975)  Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Associations

Effects of time of sowing on the establishment of oversown legumes  D Musgrave (1976) Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Association

Legumes in high country development AH Nordmeyer & MR Davis (1976) Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Association

Lotus pedunculatus establishment in intensive farming  J Brock and D Charlton  (1977) Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Association

Comparison of Huia white clover and Maku lotus oversown separately or as a mixture. WL Lowther (1976) Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Association

An evaluation of various legumes at high altitude D Musgrave (1976) Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Association

Birdsfoot trefoil (lotus corniculatus) as a potential dryland herbage legume in New Zealand  D Scott and JFL Charlton (1983) Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Association

Effect of fertilisers and environment on Lotus production on high country acid soils in Otago  MJS Floate et al (1985) Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Association

Factors affecting establishment and spread of “Grassland Maku” lotus in tussock grasslands ME WEdderburn & WL Lowther (1985) Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Association

 

Chemical Topping

A summary of research into the use of low rates of glyphosate as a pasture management tool M Casey, C Brown & D Stevens (2000) Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Association

Chemical manupulation of hill country pastures to produce legume dominance MP Rolston, DA Clark & BP Devantier (1985) Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Association

Legume oversowing on hill country in Marlborough PJ Rhodes & RJ Clare  (1983) Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Association

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